News and Project Updates

News from the Moos

2010 Hay Harvest

After years of drought, we were finally able to harvest some of our own hay to feed the Save the Cow herd. Besides cutting a newly-seeded field at New Raman Reti, two local devotee families, Gostabihari and Mahavisnupriya Cranmer and Stoka Krishna and Syamapriya Torgersen, graciously made their fields available for hay production.

Gosta's Greenery

Gosta's Greenery

Of course, the saying, “There’s no such thing as a free lunch,” applies to cows as well. There’s still the cost of fertilizing the fields and the expense of getting the hay cut and baled. Therefore, thanks also goes to the following who donated to help pay for last year’s hay harvest, which has amply fed the cows this winter: Balavanta and Ballavi Ogle, Varuna and Kirtaniya Aggarwal.

Hay Harvest 2010

Hay Harvest 2010

Radhe and Kripa Still Going Strong

Radhastami and Krishna Kripa will turn 18 this year, but each is still as strong as an ox (pardon the pun). Bhakta Mauri, our long-time dedicated teamster, who is no spring chicken himself, recently yoked up the team to “drag the field,” thus spreading the manure evenly on the pasture—and here’s the proof, so you won’t think that this is just a cock and bull story.

All Yoked Up

All Yoked Up

Mauri and the "Guys" Dragging the Field

Mauri and the "Guys" Dragging the Field

Ox Power

Ox Power

A Visit from the Vet

As Save the Cow’s herd gets older, veterinarian visits are becoming more frequent. Recently, our regular vet Randy Emmons DVM (bovine specialist and the best large-animal veterinarian in the area) came to treat Krishna Kripa’s eye and Radhika’s leg. Kripa, as a “white-faced” Holstein with non-pigmented eyelids, is susceptible to developing cancerous growths on his eyes. Dr. Emmons has successfully treated Kripa twice before for this disease as he has done for Nandini as well.

Eye Examination

Eye Examination

Injection Time

Injection Time

Radhika, another Holstein, is afflicted with an arthritic condition in her leg and hip. The injections she receives from Dr. Emmons and her daily doses of medicines provide enough relief to keep Radhika on her feet and able to get around the pasture.

Radhika's Exam

Radhika's Exam

Dr. Emmons Checks Her Joints

Dr. Emmons Checks Her Joints

Gopa the Cowherd Dog

If you’ve ever driven to the back of New Raman Reti, there’s a good chance you’ve seen (or almost run into) Gopa the cowherd dog. He showed up at the Temple in 1999 and has been here ever since, staying with the cows out in the pastures. In his younger days, Gopa performed his cowherding service with great enthusiasm and could even walk Gauri on a rope!

From the Archives

From the Archives

Gopa and Gauri

Gopa and Gauri

Now, he’s semi-retired and spends most of his days sleeping in the fields or on the road—a bad habit of many years that he won’t give up. So please be on the lookout for him in the road and drive carefully.

Resting on the Road

Resting on the Road

Project Updates

T’anks Alot

Thanks to Ganesh M. Ramanujam, Jaya Gauri and Mahavira Roberts, and the students of Bhaktivedanta Academy of North America for sponsoring three new water tanks (two are already installed and the third one is just now coming).

Shiny New Water Tank

Shiny New Water Tank

Here’s Mayapur after a drink at one of the new tanks, sprinkled with the hay that he throws on himself with his horns. He thinks it makes him look tough—aren’t  those horns warning enough?

Mayapur Takes a Drink

Mayapur Takes a Drink

Mayapur the "Menace"

Mayapur the "Menace"

Tractor Barn

Initially, we kept Save the Cow’s brand-new donated Mahindra tractor in the cow barn and the mower under a tarp. Then, we purchased an economical “Instant Garage Shelter” as a temporary solution, which we thought would last a year or two while we saved up enough funds for a permanent structure. Unfortunately, it proved to be very temporary when, within a few weeks, it came down during the first thunderstorm of the summer.

"Get that tractor outta there!"

"Get that tractor outta there!"

Mower Under Wraps

Mower Under Wraps

That inspired us to step up fundraising efforts and with the generous support of the following donors, we were able to provide a suitable shelter for Save the Cow’s tractor, which is used for delivering 800-pound hay-rolls to the cows in the winter and for mowing the pastures in the summer. Thank you to Varuna and Kirtaniya Aggarwal, Sadhu Sanga Men’s Group, and Mrs. Marion Solomon.

Mahindra's New Home

Mahindra's New Home

Maison de Mower

Maison de Mower

Barn's New Neighbor

Barn's New Neighbor

Color Coordinated

Color Coordinated

Special Delivery

Special Delivery

New Projects

New Gates

It’s about time to replace some pasture gates, which get beat up over the years by cows, cars, and the climate. We could use five new 12-foot-wide gates, which cost about $70 each.

Gate

Click  here to donate for New Gates

Seed and Fertilizer

Last year we seeded a 13-acre field at New Raman Reti with Tifton 9 Bahia grass and harvested 45 hay rolls in one cutting. To help establish a stronger, higher yielding pasture, we plan to re-seed that field again this spring. At the recommended planting rate of 20 pounds of seed per acre, we require seven 40-pound bags of Tifton 9 seed ($125 per bag) at a total cost of  $875.

A Need for Seed

A Need for Seed

That field along with the others (for both hay production and summer pasture grass) need to be fertilized with nitrogen. The cost of spreading fertilizer on all the fields comes to about $2800 (fertilizer prices are15% higher than last year).

Click here to donate for Seed or Fertilizer

Cow Shelter / Infirmary / Hospice

Another feature of caring for an aging herd is the opportunity to improve our service by providing for the special needs of geriatric bovines. In North Central Florida, healthy, young cows can live well without the need of barns. All of our pastures have trees, which provide shade and some shelter from wind and rain. As our cows age, however, they need extra care and shelter from the elements. We can make them more comfortable by providing additional shelter from summer sun and winter winds and rain.

Pole Barn Sketch

Pole Barn Sketch

To this end, Save the Cow plans to build a 12 x 24 foot multi-purpose barn shelter in one of the pastures. This structure will be open on both ends to allow free access to the cows and oriented in such a way as to provide refuge from the prevailing winds, which can be quite chilly in the wintertime. In addition, it will provide shade and shelter from the rain. This barn will be equipped with a central beam sturdy enough to support a cow sling, which can hoist a cow having difficulty standing. There will also be a gate on each end so that the building can be closed to create an infirmary for sick cows or a hospice facility when necessary. The estimated materials cost is $2500 and we plan to construct it with a combination of volunteers and local carpenters.

Click here to donate for Cow Shelter

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